Check Window Status with WinGet, ExStyle (AutoHotkey Tip)

ExStyle Settings Help to Polish AutoHotkey Window Manipulation Scripts, Plus a Couple of Tricks

Each window in Microsoft Windows includes style settings (Style and ExStyle) which control its appearance and action. You can view these settings with the CheckStyles.ahk script discussed in the blog “The WinSet, ExStyle Command for Mouse-Click Transparent Windows (Intermediate AutoHotkey Tip).” If you build AutoHotkey window manipulation tools, then you’ll find CheckStyles.ahk indispensable both as a quick reference and a tester. The CheckStyles.ahk script displays the settings for any window under the mouse cursor. Continue reading

Understanding AutoHotkey %Var% Variable Text Replacement (AutoHotkey Tip)

Handy Window Transparency Wheel Using Macro Replacement Quickly Peeks Under a Window without Moving It, Plus the Difference Between % Var and %Var% Made Easy

The AutoHotkey online documentation goes into great detail about the traditional method for retrieving values from variables (%Var%) and the force expression evaluation method (% Var). It can take the new AutoHotkey user a little while to comprehend the differences between the two. In an effort to clarify the variations and help beginners to understand when to use which method, I offer an alternative way to view the operations. For the traditional method, I prefer using the terms macro substitution or variable name replacement. Once, you understand how it works, differentiating when and how to use each technique becomes easy.

The value-added trick comes when creating variables containing new variables on-the-fly by combining the two methods (i.e. forcing an expression % which contain a %Var% variable name replacement). The first step involves replacing the variable with its value, the new variable name (%Var%). The second step requires the forced evaluation of the new variable (% VarValue) as part of an expression.

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Volume Control
Volume Wheel

A while back I installed a volume control operated by the mouse scroll wheel. Simply hover over the Windows Task Bar and scroll the mouse wheel up or down to adjust the PC speaker volume level higher or lower, respectively. A progress bar (shown at right) pops up displaying the changing volume level. I’ve added this convenient tool to my standard AutoHotkey script and use it all the time.

Tranparency Menu
Transparency Menu

At a later date, while playing with window visibility, I set up a menu for changing the transparency level for the active window (shown at left). At the end of that blog, I suggested, “If you want to get really fancy, then you might use the mouse wheel to set the transparency (or opaqueness) level.” I’ve done just that with my new SeeThruWinWheel.ahk script. Now, by holding down the CTRL key while scrolling the mouse wheel, the window under the mouse cursor becomes less opaque (WheelDown) or more opaque (WheelUp). In the course of writing this short script, I implemented a number of AutoHotkey tricks worth discussing. Continue reading

Printing with AutoHotkey Made Simple (AutoHotkey Tip)

While Other Techniques Exist for Printing Directly from AutoHotkey, Make It Easy by Using Print Drivers from Other Programs

When I first considered printing from the cheeseburger recipe script, I didn’t realize how complicated printing from AutoHotkey can get. With any printing, a number of factors come into play. First, each printer model uses particular print drivers. Second, the format of the document affects the output and drivers. Third, you may need to choose from multiple printers. Continue reading

Why AutoHotkey for Engineers and Scientists?

While Writing AutoHotkey Scripts Should Be No Problem for Most Engineers and Scientist, Many Might Be Surprised by How Much the Free Language Offers in Windows Tools

I’m not sure how many people with technical backgrounds are familiar with AutoHotkey. My guess is that quite a few have never heard of the free open source robotpicartoonlanguage. Without a personal referral or ubiquitous marketing, free software such as AutoHotkey often goes overlooked for a long period of time. It’s not until individuals realize how much AutoHotkey can do for them that they start to explore the possibilities.

No software package does everything you want. That’s why adding little extras makes any program better. The beauty of AutoHotkey is that in addition to automating individual Windows programs, it can cross boundaries and add more features to any Windows software. Plus, it has the capability to create special pop-up apps for specific usages. The Windows utility building features in AutoHotkey can be especially helpful for anyone working in a technical field. Continue reading

New Hotkey Book! (AutoHotkey Tips and Tricks)

AutoHotkey Techniques and Best Practices E-Book for Automating Your Windows Computers with Hotkey Combinations—Includes Something for Everyone!

Whether you’re a noobie to AutoHotkey scripts or an advanced programmer, of all my books, AutoHotkey Hotkeys may be the most important for new little-known tricks and useful ideas. It’s not that the other books don’t cover significant features of AutoHotkey, but this book includes some of the most practical tips for adding power to your scripts. I didn’t plan it that way. Continue reading

Fixing Grammar Problems with Google Search (Intermediate AutoHotkey Tip)

The GooglePhraseFix AutoHotkey Script Corrects Many Common Spelling and Grammar Errors While Demonstrating How to Download Information from the Web…Without Opening a Browser

As a novel and practical AutoHotkey script worth stealing, I highlighted the GooglePhaseFix script written by aaston86 in Chapter Nine of the free e-book AutoHotkey Tricks You Ought To Do With Windows. (It originally appeared in the old AutoHotkey forum.) However, I didn’t take the time in the book to point out the important AutoHotkey tricks used for quickly downloading data from Web pages for immediate use or display. The GooglePhaseFix script offers some unique tools for accessing Web sites and extracting useful information. Continue reading

Force an Expression (%) in AutoHotkey for More Powerful Commands (Beginning Hotkeys Part 17)

Learn the Secret of Adding Power and Flexibility to AutoHotkey Commands—Use Forced Expressions to Tailor Almost Anything

Four years ago I wrote my first AutoHotkey article as part of a Windows column for ComputorEdge Magazine. (One of my readers introduced me to AutoHotkey.) The more I dug into the scripting language, the more I understood how, with very little effort, it could help virtually any Windows user. I took the path of studying the AutoHotkey online documentation, searching AutoHotkey forums for ideas and techniques, testing various ways to write the code, then chronicling my insights in what eventually became first a number of articles and blogs, then (mostly beginning) books. Continue reading