Automatically Launch Apps at Windows Startup (AutoHotkey Tip)

Discover Autohotkey Tricks By Perusing Code In Other Scripts, Plus How to Load Any Windows Program at Startup

Many users find it easy to manually setup a program to auto-launch whenever they log onto Windows, but creating a shortcut and placing the new file into the Windows Startup folder requires a number of steps. With AutoHotkey, the same actions take just one command.

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Quick Fix for Inserting Color Data into Windows Paint (AutoHotkey Tip)

Auto-Fill Windows Program Data Fields Using RegEx—Plus, Alternative for Pop-up Messages

While the Coloretta Viva script copies pixel colors, transferring codes to Windows Paint gets awkward. This AutoHotkey data filling technique for multiple fields works in any Windows program. Plus, we look at another method for popping up user messages.

I recently highlighted the AutoHotkey Coloretta Viva color picking app at ComputorEdge Software Showcase. As a color matching tool, I consider the script an excellent start. However, I offer a couple of observations. Continue reading

Blocking Mouse Action (AutoHotkey BlockInput Tip)

Clarification of Earlier AutoHotkey BlockInput Command Tips

While working on a couple of chapters in my new book, I noticed that I had effectively blocked inadvertent mouse movement while running a demonstration of a Windows Paint automation routine. In the script DrawSquiggle.ahk, AutoHotkey turns off the mouse while it executes various other mouse movements. Otherwise, any accidental manual movement of the mouse cursor might screw up the final result. Most importantly, the command to block mouse action worked without raising user privilege levels or running the script as an administrator.

paintcurvetool
The DrawSquiggle.ahk script demonstrates how AutoHotkey can control the selection of tools and mouse actions in Windows Paint.

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Stop Accidental Deletions with the BlockInput Command (AutoHotkey Tip—Part Two)

AutoHotkey BlockInput Command May Cause Stuck Keys! Fix It with the KeyWait Command

In the last blog, we dealt with the issue of setting the privilege level required to use the BlockInput command. In the BackupText.ahk and IncrementalSaveText.ahk scripts, the AutoHotkey command prevents user mouse/keyboard input while the script selects and copies text to the Windows Clipboard, but it doesn’t work without Administrator privileges. After raising the script to a higher level, we demonstrated how to use Windows Task Manager to bypass the User Account Control (UAC) warning window.

At the end of the blog, I mentioned an additional problem where BlockInput causes keys (usually one or more from the Hotkey combination) to stick in the down position. Here’s the trouble. Continue reading

Stuffing More into AutoHotkey Pop-up Menus (AutoHotkey Tip)

Rather Than Increasing the Length of a System Tray Menu, Add Submenus—Plus, How to Use Menu Names (A_ThisMenu) for Conditional Actions

cheeseburgerrecipeWhen I decided to add two more recipes to the cheeseburgerwhiteicon Jack Stuffed Cheeseburger script, I ran into the problem of adding too many items (one for each step in each recipe) to the System Tray right-click menu. In the original, Cheeseburger.ahk script, I only included four steps in the menu (Ingredients, Prepare, Cook, and Serve). However, after inserting the Animal-Style Cheeseburger and the Jack Stuffed Cheeseburger (Animal Style) into the script, the number of recipe increments jumped from four to 18—plus an additional Print Recipe option for each burger. Also, since many of the steps use the same (or similar names), I needed a method for identifying each step with the proper recipe. When increasing the number of AutoHotkey menu options, cumbersome lists of items commonly crop up. You can fix these bloated menus by using submenus. Continue reading

New “Why AutoHotkey?” Book Available Free on Amazon

For One Day, Monday, May 1, 2017, the Just Published E-Book Is Available for the Kindle and Kindle Apps on Amazon.com

CoverWhy200I’ve made the new e-book Why AutoHotkey? available exclusively on Amazon and you can get the book free. It’s not that you need the book since most of its contents can be found right here on the Why AutoHotkey? page. I’ve produced this book for people who don’t know about or use AutoHotkey. As you are already accessing this blog, you’re likely well aware of AutoHotkey. My goal with this new book is to reach the AutoHotkey unaware. I’m guessing the Amazon is loaded with those types of Windows users.

I plan to make the book free more times, but Amazon only allows me to give it aways five times in a three-month period. (I would always make it free if they would let me.) Don’t worry if you miss this one. I’ll announce in this blog whenever I schedule another free book day. (Sign-up to follow the blog at the upper right of this page if you want notification whenever a new blog comes out.)

I know…I’ve expressed my disdain for the way Amazon treats independent writers, but they have such a huge reach, it would be silly for me to completely ignore them. (I still prefer people buy from ComputorEdge E-Books, but everyone must have an option.) This new compilation book should help the uninitiated to understand how much power AutoHotkey can bring to their Windows PC.

 

Create a Universal MsgBox Print Function with ControlGetText (AutoHotkey Tip)

When Nothing Else Works for Copying Text, Try the ControlGetText Command and Create a Global MsgBox Print Function

In a previous blog, I highlighted the Control, EditPaste command. The command helped me solve a particular problem where the standard Send, ^v (Windows paste shortcut) responded too slowly. I’ve since discovered that the complementary ControlGetText command resolves some sticky MsgBox printing troubles. It not only works quicker than the Windows copy shortcut (Send, ^c) but it greatly reduces code. Continue reading