Add Secret Windows Tools (God Mode) to QuickLinks Menu (AutoHotkey Tip)

This Windows Trick Works in Vista, Windows 7, 8, and 10

I first wrote about this hidden Windows technique years ago. You can find many references to it by searching the Web for the term “Windows God Mode” but I don’t know how many people make regular use of this feature. Continue reading

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New Version of QuickLinks AutoHotkey Script

Many Changes to QuickLinks.ahk Previously Discussed, Plus a Few New Features Not Yet Covered! Now Available for Download!

I’ve finally posted the latest version of QuickLinks.ahk which includes all of the discussions from the past few weeks—plus a couple more features and fixes which I plan to talk about in the near future. Continue reading

Finding Windows Icons for AutoHotkey Menus (Quick Tip)

A Useful AutoHotkey Script for Quickly Identifying Icons Embedded in Other Windows Files

In the last blog, I demonstrated how to add icons to the QuickLinks.ahk menus. The use of the tiny graphics makes it easier to pick out particular menu options. But, you need to know where to look for icons. Once found, you can easily add an icon to your menus directly from a Windows file (e.g. EXE, DLL, etc) without creating new image files. Continue reading

Automatically Add Windows Shortcuts to the QuickLinks App (AutoHotkey Tip)

Rather than Manually Creating Windows Shortcuts for QuickLinks.ahk, Use the AutoHotkey FileCreateShortcut Command

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Recently, while working with the QuickLinks.ahk script, I’ve encountered so many AutoHotkey learning points involving a number of different techniques that I plan to spend the next few blogs discussing the various possibilities. If you regularly use QuickLinks, then you’ll likely want to fashion it to your needs. While most of the tailoring gets done by working directly with the target folders, you’ll find times when changing the code works best. Rather than attempting to deliver a final product for final download, I offer instruction on how to add various features to your version of QuickLinks.ahk and leave the work up to you. The example shown in the image below reflects the changes I’ve made to my personal copy and do not appear in the posted version.

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One of the characteristics I like most about the QuickLinks.ahk script is its simplicity. It operates on a basic backbone which includes two loops (the files and folders Loop command). The first loop works through the folders found in the QuickLinks directory creating the top level menu. The second loop adds the individual links in each folder to each main menu item. Continue reading

Stuffing More into AutoHotkey Pop-up Menus (AutoHotkey Tip)

Rather Than Increasing the Length of a System Tray Menu, Add Submenus—Plus, How to Use Menu Names (A_ThisMenu) for Conditional Actions

cheeseburgerrecipeWhen I decided to add two more recipes to the cheeseburgerwhiteicon Jack Stuffed Cheeseburger script, I ran into the problem of adding too many items (one for each step in each recipe) to the System Tray right-click menu. In the original, Cheeseburger.ahk script, I only included four steps in the menu (Ingredients, Prepare, Cook, and Serve). However, after inserting the Animal-Style Cheeseburger and the Jack Stuffed Cheeseburger (Animal Style) into the script, the number of recipe increments jumped from four to 18—plus an additional Print Recipe option for each burger. Also, since many of the steps use the same (or similar names), I needed a method for identifying each step with the proper recipe. When increasing the number of AutoHotkey menu options, cumbersome lists of items commonly crop up. You can fix these bloated menus by using submenus. Continue reading

New “Why AutoHotkey?” Book Available Free on Amazon

For One Day, Monday, May 1, 2017, the Just Published E-Book Is Available for the Kindle and Kindle Apps on Amazon.com

CoverWhy200I’ve made the new e-book Why AutoHotkey? available exclusively on Amazon and you can get the book free. It’s not that you need the book since most of its contents can be found right here on the Why AutoHotkey? page. I’ve produced this book for people who don’t know about or use AutoHotkey. As you are already accessing this blog, you’re likely well aware of AutoHotkey. My goal with this new book is to reach the AutoHotkey unaware. I’m guessing the Amazon is loaded with those types of Windows users.

I plan to make the book free more times, but Amazon only allows me to give it aways five times in a three-month period. (I would always make it free if they would let me.) Don’t worry if you miss this one. I’ll announce in this blog whenever I schedule another free book day. (Sign-up to follow the blog at the upper right of this page if you want notification whenever a new blog comes out.)

I know…I’ve expressed my disdain for the way Amazon treats independent writers, but they have such a huge reach, it would be silly for me to completely ignore them. (I still prefer people buy from ComputorEdge E-Books, but everyone must have an option.) This new compilation book should help the uninitiated to understand how much power AutoHotkey can bring to their Windows PC.

 

Create a Universal MsgBox Print Function with ControlGetText (AutoHotkey Tip)

When Nothing Else Works for Copying Text, Try the ControlGetText Command and Create a Global MsgBox Print Function

In a previous blog, I highlighted the Control, EditPaste command. The command helped me solve a particular problem where the standard Send, ^v (Windows paste shortcut) responded too slowly. I’ve since discovered that the complementary ControlGetText command resolves some sticky MsgBox printing troubles. It not only works quicker than the Windows copy shortcut (Send, ^c) but it greatly reduces code. Continue reading